Archive for July, 2014

smbank SaskPower ordered to remove all 105,000 smart  meters in the province. They announced that they are  removing all the smart meters that were installed in  the province.

 

The minister responsible for SaskPower Bill Boyd said the utility company will be taking out all 105,000 smart meters around Saskatchewan.

“I think the concerns about safety are paramount here, the concerns are significant enough, anytime families are at risk in Saskatchewan, actions have to be taken and that’s why we’ve directed SaskPower accordingly,” said Minister Boyd.

The removal of the smart meters over the next six to nine months will cost around $15 million, according to SaskPower.

“We view it as similar to a recall situation and the people of Saskatchewan shouldn’t be responsible for the costs of this and we’ll do everything we can to recover those costs,” said Boyd.

Boyd will also be reviewing why the new meters weren’t properly studied or tested before they were installed in homes.

I don’t know whether there was enough testing done. We’ll certainly be conducting, along with SaskPower, an internal review of the procurement procedures around this around the safety concerns people had,” added Boyd.

“We want to determine when these were originally ordered, if there were safety concerns known at that point in time, so we have a lot of questions we’re going to be discussing with SaskPower about how this came to be.”

Earlier this month SaskPower temporarily suspended its installation of smart meters around the province after half a dozen caught fire.

 

http://globalnews.ca/news/1483134/saskpower-ordered-to-remove-all-smart-meters-in-the-province/

Advertisements

Dr Erica Mallery-Blythe: British Society of Ecological Medicine (BSEM – March 2014) gives a seminar on hidden causes of your symptoms that could be linked to electromagnetic sensitivity from cell phones, Wi-Fi (smart meters) and computers. A must watch (only :35 minutes)

http://vimeo.com/100623585

 

SMEMFsymptoms

 

 

In this information powerpoint the AARP raises concerns on the Time-Value-Rate structure and how it will affect the elderly and those on fixed incomes. They also warn of the pre-paid electric “cards” used in some areas and how shutting off service when one forgets to put money in the kitty, will affect the health of seniors. The first bit of this presentation educates about smart meters and then they go into the concerns and what they are trying to do about it.

http://bit.ly/1wqsqRg

If they already have this in the works… why do we need smart meters. They can do this with the units we have…
Massachusetts DPU Says Time of Use Pricing Will Be the Default for All Customers

In a recent order, the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities (“Department” or “DPU”) stated that time varying rates are an essential component of grid modernization. As a result, the design of basic service must change to incorporate time of use (“TOU”) rates for all customers, including residential customers. The Department noted that in 2013, the average wholesale market price of electricity over the course of the year was $56 per megawatt-hour (“MWh”), but the peak wholesale price in the summer reached nearly $870 per MWh and in winter nearly $1,300 per MWh. However, despite the volatility in the wholesale market, basic service customers’ rates did not reflect the time varying nature of electricity supply costs. The Department sees this as a problem. (Warning: DPU should take a short flight down to PJM land where customers’ exposure to last winter’s price spikes is still being discussed.) Nevertheless, DPU is concerned because under the current basic service structure in Massachusetts, rates do not reflect the time varying nature of electricity supply costs. Additionally, customers who are able to shift more of their electric usage to off-peak/lower wholesale cost hours subsidize customers who use more electricity during hours with higher wholesale electricity prices.

The Time Varying Rates Order describes a policy framework that will require electric distribution companies to offer two basic service TOU options:

  1. A default product with time of use pricing that includes a critical peak pricing (“CPP”) component. Under this TOU pricing structure, the retail electricity price will be higher during certain hours of the week when customers typically use more electricity and wholesale energy prices rise (e.g., the “on-peak” hours of noon to 8:00 p.m. each weekday) than during the remaining hours of the week when electricity usage and wholesale prices are typically lower (i.e., the “off-peak” hours).
  2. A flat rate with a peak time rebate (“PTR”) option. With a PTR, customers will receive a rebate if they lower their electricity use relative to a pre-established baseline during times when wholesale hourly energy prices are highest. Thus, under PTR, customers will have an incentive to lower their electricity usage when it is most critical to do so, but even those who ignore the incentive will be insulated against higher peak prices because they will pay one price for all electricity consumption.

The Department anticipates that the on-peak rate will be higher and the off-peak rate lower than a flat-rate product. Thus, customers who respond to price signals by reducing on-peak energy consumption will pay less than they would under a flat rate.

 

See this good article on how bees are being affected by Wi-Fi and the EMFs generated by the smart grid. No bees – no pollination – no food for us!

http://www.naturalscience.org/fileadmin/portabledocuments/folder_bees_en_ed1_1106_web.pdf

 

beescvr_Page_2